“It’s not triple j’s fault. They hear a great song, they see a great artist [Mallrat], and it’s local, hallelujah. And they go after it and it reacted, and it nailed. And we’re sitting over in America going, ‘Oh for Christ’s sakes.”

Fear At The Top sees CEO of The Brag Media Luke Girgis interview heads of companies in the music industry about how they got to where they are. He also touches on all the mistakes they’ve made, and what they’ve learned from running their hugely successful companies.

In this episode of Fear At The Top, Girgis interviews Nettwerk Music Group CEO Terry McBride, who has built an international empire which has sold more than 170 million albums and today boasts offices in London, Hamburg, Boston, Los Angeles, New York and headquarters in Vancouver, Canada.

During the expansive chat, the pair discuss how Spotify algorithms work, why Nettwerk sign so many Australian artists, and why the major labels don’t focus on streaming.

They also dive deep into McBride’s controversial – yet wholly data-backed – theory that if triple j break an artist too early it will have a negative impact on the rest of the world.

Terry McBride has a strong Aussie connection through Nettwerk. Its roster features 17 acts from the land Down Under, including Xavier Rudd, Angus & Julia Stone, John Butler Trio, Boy & Bear, Hermitude, Japanese Wallpaper, Jack River and Mallrat.

In 2003, McBride became the youngest-ever recipient of the Special Achievement Award at Canada’s Junos for his work with Avril Lavigne, Coldplay, Sarah Mclachlan and many others. He is known as one of Canada’s “foremost artist managers and visionaries.”

Terry McBride was in Australia for the annual BIGSOUND conference last month, where he met with Luke Girgis for Fear At The Top. McBride delivered an illuminating Keynote where he theorised concepts and strategies that are out of the box, and frankly, question whether the box even exists.